Ransomware would be much worse if it wasn't for email security solutions

Posted by   Martijn Grooten on   Jan 5, 2017

Many experts believe that ransomware is set to become an even worse problem in 2017 than it was in 2016 — which is rather bad news, given the damage it has already done.

Still, the problem could be much worse: a test of security products performed by Virus Bulletin in November/December 2016 showed that at least 199 out of every 200 emails with a malicious attachment were blocked by email security solutions (or spam filters). Add to this user awareness, which leads to attachments not being opened in many cases, or macros not being enabled, as well as endpoint security solutions preventing the malware from doing its work, and the end result is that only a very small percentage of the malware sent via email will lead to a malware infection.

The test was run over a 19-day period, during which dozens of different malicious spam campaigns were seen, with the typical attachment being a malware downloader that would most likely have led to ransomware. No particular campaign stood out as being more difficult to block than others, suggesting that there is no silver bullet for spammers to bypass filters.

 

malspam_nov2016.png

 

Of course, the fact that spam is sent out in large volumes means that even a very low success rate is sufficient for attackers to make a good return on investment — and thus to cause a lot of damage. But after previously having seen how well web security solutions block exploit kits (another common ransomware infection vector), it is good to be reminded of just how much more secure our digital lives are made by security products.

The test, which was part of our VBSpam series, also looked at how well solutions blocked spam in general and how well they managed to avoid false positives. 16 of the solutions tested achieved a VBSpam award, of which six — OnlyMyEmailESET, Bitdefender, Fortinet, Libra Esva and Vade Retro MailCube — reached the standard required to earn a VBSpam+ award.

For full details, read the VBSpam Comparative Review for December 2016, which also includes more details on the blocking of malicious spam.

VBSpam-quadrant-Dec16.jpg

twitter.png
fb.png
linkedin.png
googleplus.png
reddit.png

 

Latest posts:

Standalone product test: FireEye Endpoint

Virus Bulletin ran a standalone test on FireEye's Endpoint Security solution.

VB2017 video: Consequences of bad security in health care

Jelena Milosevic, a nurse with a passion for IT security, is uniquely placed to witness poor security practices in the health care sector, and to fully understand the consequences. Today, we publish the recording of a presentation given by Jelena at…

Vulnerabilities play only a tiny role in the security risks that come with mobile phones

Both bad news (all devices were pwnd) and good news (pwning is increasingly difficult) came from the most recent mobile Pwn2Own competition. But the practical security risks that come with using mobile phones have little to do with vulnerabilities.

VB2017 paper: The (testing) world turned upside down

At VB2017 in Madrid, industry veteran and ESET Senior Research Fellow David Harley presented a paper on the state of security software testing. Today we publish David's paper in both HTML and PDF format.

VB2017 video: Turning Trickbot: decoding an encrypted command-and-control channel

Trickbot, a banking trojan which appeared this year, seems to be a new, more modular, and more extensible malware descendant of the notorious Dyre botnet trojan. At VB2017, Symantec researcher Andrew Brandt presented a walkthrough of a typical…