Throwback Thursday: The malware battle: reflections and forecasts

Posted by   Helen Martin on   Jan 5, 2017

"Another year has come to its end and the malware battle still rages on. It seems to be a never-ending uphill struggle to secure digital information." This could have been written just weeks ago, but in fact comes from an article written 13 years ago, in which Jamz Yaneza reflected on the year just ended and pondered what 2004 would have in store for the AV industry.

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Jamz observed that, in 2003, mass-mailing worms were using email with social engineering to entice users to click and execute attachments; self-compression and encryption coupled with anti-debugging code was a growing concern; vulnerabilities and bugs in commonly used software were becoming favourite tools in attackers' arsenals; there was a noticeable increase in malware employing Denial of Service attacks; and the use of self-installing malware URLs to pull down updates and components from hacker-compromised Internet locations was an emerging technique.

Jamz also made some predictions for the year ahead, imagining that 2004 would see, among other things, more blended threats; continued attempts by malware to disable anti-virus, personal firewall and anti-trojan programs; and the need for web-filtering software in corporate environments to prevent inadvertent redirection to malware-related websites.

Read all of Jamz's observations and predictions here in HTML-format, or download the article here as a PDF.

 

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