VB2016 paper: Open Source Malware Lab

Posted by   Martijn Grooten on   Jan 4, 2017

Security experts aren't necessarily known for being skilled at predicting the future, but if there's one prediction they are guaranteed to get right, it's that there will be a lot of new malware in the coming year.

As a consequence, increasing numbers of companies and researchers are likely to turn their attentions to setting up their own malware analysis labs. For those tasked with doing so on a limited budget, there is good news: you can get a long way simply by using open source tools, as demonstrated by ThreatConnect researcher Robert Simmons in his VB2016 paper "Open Source Malware Lab".

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Whether you are setting up a new malware analysis lab, or want to see how your existing lab can be improved, we have uploaded Robert's paper in both HTML and PDF format. We have also uploaded the presentation video to our YouTube channel.

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