VB2016 video: Neverquest: Crime as a Service and On the Hunt for the Big Bucks

Posted by   Martijn Grooten on   Jan 30, 2017

Earlier this month, Spanish police officers arrested a Russian national on suspicion of creating the Neverquest banking trojan. Neverquest, also known as Vawtrak, is one of the most prevalent banking trojans of the moment, so while the arrest might not have a significant impact on cybercrime overall, it is good news: it sends the important message that writing malware is not without the risk of arrest.

At Virus Bulletin we are very familiar with Neverquest. Two years ago, we published the paper "Nesting Doll: unwrapping Vawtrak", in which Fortinet researcher Raul Alvarez looked at the various layers of obfuscation used by the malware. And last October, at VB2016 in Denver, CSIS's Peter Kruse gave a talk entitled "Neverquest: Crime as a Service and On the Hunt for the Big Bucks".

With the malware in the news, we have taken the opportunity to upload the video of Peter's VB2016 presentation to our YouTube channel.

Has your organisation been hit by a banking trojan, or have you maybe prevented one from doing damage? We want to hear from you! The Call for Papers for VB2017 (4-6 October in Madrid, Spain) is now open.

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