Throwback Thursday: Once a researcher...

Posted by   Helen Martin on   Feb 23, 2017

VB was saddened to learn this week of the passing of one of the pioneers of the AV industry, Ross M. Greenberg.

 

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Ross Greenberg, author of Flushot, Virex PC, and telecommunications program RamNet UUCP: a man of diverse interests.

 

Ross M. Greenberg was the author of Flushot, one of the world's first anti-virus programs, and shortly after that, Virex PC. Yet by 1995, he had distanced himself from the main AV industry – finding himself put off by the antics of certain vendors, whom he considered less than ethical in their tactics and methods – and moved to a farm in upstate New York where he developed telecommunications programs.

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In November 1995, VB talked to Ross about his background, his views on the AV industry, and life at "Virus Acres" farm.

Read the interview here in HTML-format, or download the article here as a PDF.

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