Throwback Thursday: Michelangelo - Graffiti Not Art

Posted by   Helen Martin on   Mar 9, 2017

This week marked the 25th anniversary of the Michelangelo virus.

The boot sector virus was designed to trigger on 6 March 1992, on which date it would override all of the data on the infected machine's hard drive.

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The Michelangelo virus – which was so named by researchers for the fact that 6 March was also the birth date of Italian Renaissance artist Michelangelo Buonarroti – captured the imagination of the press and kicked up a media storm.

In January 1992, following reports of the virus spreading in the UK, VB's then Technical Editor Fridrik Skulason wrote a detailed analysis of Michelanglo. Read the analysis here in HTML-format, or download the article here as a PDF.

One of VB's more recent Technical Editors, Dr Morton Swimmer, has also put together a fun animation to mark the 25th anniversary of the virus – whose infamy, he points out, helped encourage the general public to take PC security more seriously.

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