VB2017 Early Bird discount to expire this week

Posted by   Martijn Grooten on   Jun 28, 2017

"Hundreds of businesses, both large and small, have suffered from the handiwork of the virus writers. It is now clear that a sabotage mentality exists and new computer viruses destroy data and programs – the more extreme examples being programmed to format hard-disks."

Aside from a few technical details, this could have been written today. It was written back in 1989 though, by Virus Bulletin's first editor, Edward Wilding, in the very first edition of Virus Bulletin (pdf), which appeared 28 years ago on Saturday.

In the 28 years since then, Virus Bulletin has closely followed the security landscape in general, and the malware scene in particular, through technical articles, comparative tests, and of course our annual conference. We have always believed that the right response in security is to follow trends rather than hypes, and to provide nuance and technical analysis rather than spread fearmongering and rumours.

The Virus Bulletin conference is thus not the right place to get your security-buzzword bingo scorecard completed. There are many other reasons to go to the conference though: to learn about the current threats from top-class researchers; to find out what others are doing to prevent those threats; and to meet experts from around the world to build connections that will be useful throughout the year.

And if you register before the weekend, you qualify for a 10% Early Bird discount, which coincidentally expires on our birthday (1 July). So see you in Madrid!

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