Virus Bulletin to sponsor BSides London

Posted by   Martijn Grooten on   Jun 1, 2017

When VB'91, the inaugural Virus Bulletin conference, took place (in 1991), there were few security conferences on the scene and there were more virus researchers than computer viruses. These days, there are more security conferences than there were people attending that very first VB conference!

We think this is a great development and we enjoy attending other conferences. We are particularly fond of the BSides events that take place all over the world (next month, for instance, in Myanmar), which bring together local security communities in volunteer-run, but often well organized events. 

With most of Virus Bulletin's core team based in the UK, we will be taking the opportunity to attend BSides London next week. The London conference is one of the oldest and biggest of the BSides events, and one at which I had the honour to speak in 2015. Indeed, this year, Virus Bulletin has signed up to become a Silver sponsor of the BSides London, and we consider it an honour to link our name with the event.

We are very much looking forward both to meeting delegates and to attending the talks. Please do say "hello" if you see us – and look out for the VB2017 flyer in the conference bag (we do, of course, hope to see many of you in Madrid in October, for one of the most international security conference in the world!).

Speaking of which, if you are going to BSides, make sure you catch Jelena Milosevich's talk, in which she will draw on her experience of working in a hospital to talk about building security awareness. Given what WannaCry showed about the state of security within the NHS (and, by implication, in healthcare organizations around the world), this is a very important subject; we are thrilled to have Jelena on the VB2017 programme, where she will also cover this subject.

Here's to a great BSides!

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