Calling next-gen security researchers: student discount for VB2017 announced

Posted by   Martijn Grooten on   Jul 7, 2017

Next-gen firewalls, next-gen anti-virus. At Virus Bulletin, we follow the 'next-gen' trends with interest, if only because behind the marketing there is often very interesting technology.

But there is another kind of next-gen that we are even more interested in: next-gen security researchers.

In three months' time, some of the greatest minds in security from around the world will get together for VB2017 in Madrid, Spain. But much as the total amount of knowledge and experience of these people might seem rather daunting, VB2017 is anything but an exclusive event.

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Many of those attending will be relatively new to security, which is great, because the Virus Bulletin conference is an excellent place to learn about the global threat landscape, and about what people are doing to fend off such threats. The conference is also small enough and friendly enough to allow attendees to go up to a speaker after their talk and ask them to explain things a bit more; most will be more than happy to do so.

And because we know most next-gen security researchers don't yet have the budgets of the current generation, we are pleased to announce that for the third year running, we have a limited number of student tickets available for VB2017. For $400 (+VAT), those in full-time education can attend the conference and all social events — that's a discount of almost 79% on full-price tickets! Just send an email to conference@virusbulletin.com and let us know where and what you are studying.

Of course, given the much-discussed security skills-shortage, this also gives the current generation of security professionals an extra reason to attend — on the back of three days of very interesting talks and networking, you may even find a valuable new member for your team.

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