Nominations opened for fourth Péter Szőr Award

Posted by   Martijn Grooten on   Jul 4, 2017

Virus Bulletin is seeking nominations for the fourth annual Péter Szőr Award.

The award was inaugurated during the VB2014 conference, in honour of late security researcher and malware expert Péter Szőr, who passed away in November 2013. It is given to for the best piece of technical security research published during the preceding year; for the upcoming award this is between 1 July 2016 and 30 June 2017.

Peter Szor

Péter Szőr, a 'brilliant mind and a true gentleman'.

A shortlist will be drawn up from the nominations received, from which the Virus Bulletin Advisory Board will select the winner. This award will be presented during VB2017 in Madrid.

Past winners of the award include a team of ESET researchers for their paper on the 'Windigo' malware campaign and an Intel Security team for their paper (pdf) on a polymorphic botnet. Last year's winner was Yonathan Klijnsma (Fox-IT), for his paper (pdf) on the Mofang APT group.

There is certainly no shortage of good security papers being published, but the news tombola in which IT security finds itself means that we quickly forget even those that initially stand out. The Péter Szőr Award is an excellent opportunity to highlight and recognise those really brilliant papers, while at the same time remembering the talented researcher who is still missed by many.

peterszoraward2016.png

Sanchit Karve, one of the winners of the 2015 award, congratulating 2016 winner Yonathan Klijnsma.

To submit your nominations for this year's award please use this form, or else email editor@virusbulletin.com.

twitter.png
fb.png
linkedin.png
googleplus.png
reddit.png

 

Latest posts:

We are more ready for IPv6 email than we may think

Though IPv6 is gradually replacing IPv4 on the Internet's network layer, email is lagging behind, the difficulty in blocking spam sent over IPv6 cited as a reason not to move. But would we really have such a hard time blocking spam sent over IPv6?

Subtle change could see a reduction in installation of malicious Chrome extensions

Google has made a subtle change to its Chrome browser, banning the inline installation of new extensions, thus making it harder for malware authors to trick users into unwittingly installing malicious extensions.

Paper: EternalBlue: a prominent threat actor of 2017–2018

We publish a paper by researchers from Quick Heal Security Labs in India, who study the EternalBlue and DoublePulsar exploits in full detail.

'North Korea' a hot subject among VB2018 talks

Several VB2018 papers deal explicitly or implicitly with threats that have been attributed to North Korean actors.

Expired domain led to SpamCannibal's blacklist eating the whole world

The domain of the little-used SpamCannibal DNS blacklist had expired, resulting in it effectively listing every single IP address.

We have placed cookies on your device in order to improve the functionality of this site, as outlined in our cookies policy. However, you may delete and block all cookies from this site and your use of the site will be unaffected. By continuing to browse this site, you are agreeing to Virus Bulletin's use of data as outlined in our privacy policy.