Save the dates: VB2018 to take place 3-5 October 2018

Posted by   Martijn Grooten on   Jul 17, 2017

While we hope that you have already circled the dates of 4-6 October 2017 in your agendas, and that you will join us and security experts from around the world for VB2017 in Spain (book your ticket now, before it's too late!), we wanted to share another set of dates for your diaries: 3-5 October 2018.

These are the dates of VB2018, the 28th Virus Bulletin International Conference. The conference location won't be unveiled until the closing ceremony of VB2017, but I can tell you that it's an exciting location that many of you will want to visit.

VB2018-no-location-withdate.jpg

As in previous years, the call for papers will open in January 2018, the programme will be announced in April 2018, and a call for last-minute papers will open in the summer of 2018.

You don't have to wait that long to submit your hot research though: the call for VB2017 last-minute papers – the ten speaking slots set aside for very hot, topical research – will open later this month.

Sponsorship opportunities for both VB2017 and VB2018 are available; please contact Allison Sketchley (allison.sketchley@virusbulletin.com) for more information.

 

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