VB2017 call for last-minute papers opened

Posted by   Martijn Grooten on   Jul 26, 2017

Virus Bulletin has opened the call for last-minute papers for VB2017.

The VB2017 programme already boasts some 40 talks, with a number of Small Talks to be added very soon. But neither threats nor research stop the moment we publish the conference programme, which means that there will be a lot of material that is simply too new to have made it onto the programme through the original call for papers.

It is for this reason – and for this kind of 'hot' research – that we have set aside 10 speaking slots on the VB2017 programme specifically for 'last-minute' papers that deal with up-to-the-minute material.

Submit a proposal before Sunday 3 September 2017 for a chance to get one of these ten slots!

Competition is likely to be tough: if we were to accept submissions from everyone who in the past few months has emailed to ask about the last-minute papers, we'd have to extend the conference itself until the end of the month! Don't be discouraged by this though: the call for last-minute papers has always been many times oversubscribed, yet past conferences have seen some great talks from experienced and first-time speakers alike.

Presenters of last-minute papers are not required to write a paper, just to deliver an excellent 30-minute presentation on relevant hot research. We aim to notify those whose submissions have been selected within a week of the deadline.

And of course, to make sure you don't miss out on the event, don't forget to register! (Should you be selected as a last-minute presenter, you will receive a refund of your registration fee.)

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