VB2017 paper: The sprawling market of consumer spyware

Posted by   Martijn Grooten on   Oct 25, 2017

Nation states, criminals and bored teenagers are the various kinds of adversaries the security community is used to facing, and they are all well understood. There is one type of adversary, however, that is less well understood: that of an abusive partner or ex-partner.

Yet, for many people, this is a very real threat: the market for consumer spyware is huge and such malware has been used in the most tragic kinds of abusive relationships.

This is an important topic for the security community, which is why we invited Joseph Cox, a journalist from The Daily Beast, to give a talk at VB2017 on this subject – a talk in which he presented data from a lot of the research he had done during his time at Vice Motherboard.

joseph-cox-3-crop.jpg 

Today, we have uploaded the recording of Joseph's presentation to our YouTube channel.

I hope that, apart from watching it, security researchers will keep this particular threat model in mind when designing security solutions.

 

twitter.png
fb.png
linkedin.png
googleplus.png
reddit.png

 

Latest posts:

Necurs pump-and-dump spam campaign pushes obscure cryptocurrency

A Necurs pump-and-dump spam campaign pushing the lesser known Swisscoin botnet is mostly background noise for the Internet.

Alleged author of creepy FruitFly macOS malware arrested

A 28-year old man from Ohio has been arrested on suspicion of having created the mysterious FruitFly malware that targeted macOS and used it to spy on its victims.

The threat and security product landscape in 2017

At the start of the new year, Virus Bulletin looks back at the threats seen in the 2017 and at the security products that are available to help mitigate them.

Spamhaus report shows many botnet controllers look a lot like legitimate servers

Spamhaus's annual report on botnet activity shows that botherders tend to use popular, legitimate hosting providers, domain registrars and top-level domains when setting up command-and-control servers.

Tips on researching tech support scams

As tech support scammers continue to target the computer illiterate through cold calling, VB's Martijn Grooten uses his own experience to share some advice on how to investigate such scams.