Throwback Thursday: Anti-malware testing undercover

Posted by   Martijn Grooten on   Nov 30, 2017

The testing of security products has been a hotly debated topic in the industry for at least the past two decades. It was, for instance, the topic of a popular VB2017 paper by ESET's David Harley and will be the main focus of next week's AMTSO meeting in Beijing, which Virus Bulletin will attend.

Last year, at VB2016 another paper looked at various aspects of security testing. In it, ESET's Righard Zwienenberg and Panda Security's Luis Corrons looked at what kind of influence tests and vendors have on each other, as well as at the controversial subject of cheating a test.

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For this week's Throwback Thursday, we have published Righard and Luis's paper (HTML and PDF) and also uploaded the video of their presentation to our YouTube channel.

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