Throwback Thursday: The beginning of the end(point): where we are now and where we'll be in five years

Posted by   Martijn Grooten on   Nov 23, 2017

Over the coming weeks and months, we plan to use the Throwback Thursday slot to look back at and publish some great VB conference presentations from our archives.

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We start this week by publishing the recording of a VB2016 presentation by Adrian Sanabria, then at 451 Research, who gave a thought-provoking talk on the past, present and future of endpoint security.

In his talk, Adrian looked beyond the marketing hype and tried to answer questions such as: how has the threat to endpoints evolved? How have endpoint security products evolved? Does 'next-gen' really mean anything? And of course, the age-old question: is anti-virus dead?

If this topic interests you, you will be pleased to know that Adrian (now at Savage Security, which he co-founded) will host a webinar on this very topic on Thursday 30 November 2017.

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