VB2017 video: Consequences of bad security in health care

Posted by   Martijn Grooten on   Nov 13, 2017

"You are probably asking yourselves what a nurse is doing at a cybersecurity conference. Trust me, my colleagues are even more surprised, because they truly believe that hospitals have the best security ever."

Thus Jelena Milosevic, a nurse with a passion for IT security, began her VB2017 presentation, 'Consequences of bad security in health care', in which she shared her unique inside view of IT security in hospitals. Anyone who follows the security headlines will know that hospitals do not exactly have the best security, with WannaCry being a prominent example of what can happen when things go badly wrong.

In order to highlight the importance of security for hospitals in a less dramatic way than yet another WannaCry, we need to have security champions on the inside. People like Jelena, who understand security but who also understand how hospitals work and that their priorities, naturally, lie elsewhere, are very important in what is likely to remain a challenge for a long time to come.

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Jelena Milosevic shares her experiences of security in the health care sector at VB2017.

We were honoured that Jelena was willing to share her experiences with the VB2017 delegates, and today we have uploaded the video of her presentation to our YouTube channel.

 

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