Security Planner gives security advice based on your threat model

Posted by   Martijn Grooten on   Dec 13, 2017

During the upcoming holiday season, many security professionals will be visiting relatives and, during their visit, being asked to fulfil the role of ad-hoc tech support.

Apart from removing the Ask toolbar from their browser, this is a great opportunity to improve the security of their devices more permanently. This is also when one realizes that different people have different threat models, and thus different security requirements. Your own privacy concerns about social media, for instance, may not be shared by others, who value convenience more often. Someone who's mostly worried about the security of online banking shouldn't care as much about physical access to their devices as someone who has been in an abusive relationship.

This is why I am really excited about the Security Planner, launched by Citizen Lab this week. It lets the subject answer a few questions about the threats they are concerned about and, based on their answers, gives practical advice as to how they can make themselves more secure.

Of course, given Citizen Lab's focus on attacks faced by the human rights community, people with these kinds of threat models are well served by the Security Planner, and I really like how it urges people who face actual threats to seek emergency support; for some threat models, an online 'HowTo' simply isn't good enough.

Meanwhile, the guide also provides helpful advice for the relative who only uses the Internet to check Facebook and to buy the occasional item from an online shop.

Finally, if your relatives really don't want to discuss threat models with you, and they expect you to just tell them what to do, Robert Graham's Holiday Cybersecurity Guide gives some practical advice that should work for anyone, meaning that everyone can enjoy happy and cyber-safe holidays.

citizenlab_securityplanner.png
Image source: Citizen Lab, licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Canada license.

twitter.png
fb.png
linkedin.png
googleplus.png
reddit.png

 

Latest posts:

Necurs pump-and-dump spam campaign pushes obscure cryptocurrency

A Necurs pump-and-dump spam campaign pushing the lesser known Swisscoin botnet is mostly background noise for the Internet.

Alleged author of creepy FruitFly macOS malware arrested

A 28-year old man from Ohio has been arrested on suspicion of having created the mysterious FruitFly malware that targeted macOS and used it to spy on its victims.

The threat and security product landscape in 2017

At the start of the new year, Virus Bulletin looks back at the threats seen in the 2017 and at the security products that are available to help mitigate them.

Spamhaus report shows many botnet controllers look a lot like legitimate servers

Spamhaus's annual report on botnet activity shows that botherders tend to use popular, legitimate hosting providers, domain registrars and top-level domains when setting up command-and-control servers.

Tips on researching tech support scams

As tech support scammers continue to target the computer illiterate through cold calling, VB's Martijn Grooten uses his own experience to share some advice on how to investigate such scams.