Throwback Thursday: BGP - from route hijacking to RPKI: how vulnerable is the Internet?

Posted by   Martijn Grooten on   Dec 14, 2017

Yesterday, a 'mysterious event' involving BGP, the Internet's border gateway protocol, led to the traffic to many popular websites being routed for around six minutes.

BGP hijacks – the Internet equivalent of changing traffic direction signs – are not very common but occur more often than one would expect for a technology that is so important for the Internet. The technique has been used in the past to steal freshly mined Bitcoin, as well as to send spam from different netblocks.

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Mike Benjamin, who works in security at Level 3 Communications, spends a lot of his free time looking at BGP and BGP hijacks. At VB2016 in Denver last year, he gave a presentation on the subject. For this week's Throwback Thursday, we have uploaded the video of Mike's presentation to our YouTube channel.

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