VB2017 videos on attacks against Ukraine

Posted by   Martijn Grooten on   Dec 21, 2017

(In)security is a global problem that affects every country in the world, but in recent years, none has been as badly hit as Ukraine.

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The most well known malware that affected the country is (Not)Petya, a ransomware/wiper threat that had global impact (it cost shipping firm Maersk alone $300m in lost revenues), but which hit Ukrainian businesses particularly hard. The malware spread through a compromised update pushed out by M.E.Doc's tax accounting software, which is popular in the country.

In a VB2017 presentation, NioGuard's Alexander Adamov, himself based in Ukraine, discussed how (Not)Petya and related attacks worked and what impact they had. We have now uploaded the video of his presentation to our YouTube channel.

Another VB2017 presentation, by regular VB presenters and ESET researchers Robert Lipovsky and Anton Cherepanov, looked at another, possibly even more damaging threat against Ukraine: Industroyer, the first malware designed specifically to cause a power blackout – something which did indeed happen in December 2015.

Robert and Anton are new neither to advanced attacks nor to attacks against Ukraine, as can be seen from two previous VB presentations on BlackEnergy. We have also uploaded the video of their VB2017 presentation on Industroyer to our YouTube channel.

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