VB2014: Slides day two

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Sep 25, 2014

Another day of excellent presentations.

The second day of VB2014 was just as successful as the first one, and saw 22 interesting presentations, divided over two parallel streams, on a wide range of security topics. They included the seven last-minute papers that were added to the programme only three weeks ago.

Just as yesterday, many speakers let us share their presentation slides, and we hope to add more after the conference:

The day's conference activities are not yet over for today though, and delegates are eagerly anticipating the VB gala dinner tonight. As always, the gala dinner promises to be a fun-filled evening, and importantly, it will also see the presentation of the first annual Péter Ször award, in honour of the brilliant, and much missed researcher (and VB advisory board member) who passed away last year.

Enjoy the gala dinner - and see you tomorrow!

Posted on 25 September 2014 by Martijn Grooten

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