Paper: Script in a lossy stream

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Mar 2, 2015

Dénes Óvári explains how to store code in lossily compressed JPEG data.

Malformed PDFs have become a common way to deliver malware. Naturally, when this started to happen, anti-virus products began scanning inside PDF files for traces of malicious code and, equally naturally, malware authors started to obfuscate that code to circumvent scanners.

Not everything can be used to store code though. Data streams compressed using lossy compressors like JPXDecode and DCTDecode are deemed unsuitable for storing any kind of code. After all, the lossy compression means one should not be able to retrieve an exact copy of the uncompressed data. For performance reasons, scanners therefore usually ignore this data.

But are they right to do so? Today, we publish a paper by CSIS researcher Dénes Óvári, who found a way to store code as a JPEG image using the DCTDecode filter. His trick, which he explains in the paper, was to encode the data as a greyscale JPEG image, so that no rounding occurs when the images is converted from the RGB to the YCbCr colour space.

To show that this is not merely a theoretical possibility, Dénes wrote a proof-of-concept where a simple (and in this case harmless) piece of JavaScript code was thus embedded inside a PDF.

You can read the paper here in HTML format or here as a PDF. Remember that all content published by Virus Bulletin can be read free of charge, with no registration required.

Both Adobe and anti-virus vendors were given advance notification of the publication of this paper.

Posted on 2 March 2015 by Martijn Grooten

twitter.png
fb.png
linkedin.png
googleplus.png
reddit.png

 

Latest posts:

Firefox 59 to make it a lot harder to use data URIs in phishing attacks

Firefox developer Mozilla has announced that, as of version 59 of the browser, many kinds of data URIs, which provide a way to create "domainless web content", will not be rendered in the browser, thus making this trick - used in various phishing…

Standalone product test: FireEye Endpoint

Virus Bulletin ran a standalone test on FireEye's Endpoint Security solution.

VB2017 video: Consequences of bad security in health care

Jelena Milosevic, a nurse with a passion for IT security, is uniquely placed to witness poor security practices in the health care sector, and to fully understand the consequences. Today, we publish the recording of a presentation given by Jelena at…

Vulnerabilities play only a tiny role in the security risks that come with mobile phones

Both bad news (all devices were pwnd) and good news (pwning is increasingly difficult) came from the most recent mobile Pwn2Own competition. But the practical security risks that come with using mobile phones have little to do with vulnerabilities.

VB2017 paper: The (testing) world turned upside down

At VB2017 in Madrid, industry veteran and ESET Senior Research Fellow David Harley presented a paper on the state of security software testing. Today we publish David's paper in both HTML and PDF format.