VB2015 paper: Sizing cybercrime: incidents and accidents, hints and allegations

Posted by   Martijn Grooten on   Feb 11, 2016

How big is cybercrime?

Various attempts have been made to measure the size of cybercrime around the world, or in individual countries, but how reliable are the methodologies used, and what do they actually measure?

In the paper "Sizing cybercrime: incidents and accidents, hints and allegations" presented at VB2015 in Prague, ESET researcher Stephen Cobb looked at the available literature on the issue and tried among other things to answer these questions.

You can read Stephen's paper here in HTML-format, or download it here as a PDF, and find the video on our YouTube channel, or embedded below.

cobbsizingcybercrime.pngAre you interested in presenting your research at the upcoming Virus Bulletin conference (VB2016), in Denver 5-7 October 2016? The call for papers is now open.

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