Throwback Thursday: Tools of the DDoS Trade

Posted by   Helen Martin on   May 4, 2017

According to a recent report by analytics firm Neustar (summarized in a Threatpost blog post here), DDoS attacks are on the increase, are taking longer to detect, and are costing firms more to fix - with an average loss per attack of roughly $2.5 million among those companies surveyed.

Back in 2000, DDoS attacks were a relatively newly emerging menace (even though the concept had been around for some time), and February 2000 saw some of the Internet's largest websites, including CNN, MSN, Yahoo and others, disrupted by DDoS attacks.

Today, we turn back the clock to September 2000, when Aleksander Czarnowksi provided an overview of the DDoS tools of the day, saying "We still do not have one proper method of dealing with DDoS attacks, and what we have seen up to now might not be the end of it."

Throwback-Thursday-VB.jpg

 The article can be read here in HTML-format, or downloaded here as a PDF.

twitter.png
fb.png
linkedin.png
googleplus.png
reddit.png

 

Latest posts:

Firefox 59 to make it a lot harder to use data URIs in phishing attacks

Firefox developer Mozilla has announced that, as of version 59 of the browser, many kinds of data URIs, which provide a way to create "domainless web content", will not be rendered in the browser, thus making this trick - used in various phishing…

Standalone product test: FireEye Endpoint

Virus Bulletin ran a standalone test on FireEye's Endpoint Security solution.

VB2017 video: Consequences of bad security in health care

Jelena Milosevic, a nurse with a passion for IT security, is uniquely placed to witness poor security practices in the health care sector, and to fully understand the consequences. Today, we publish the recording of a presentation given by Jelena at…

Vulnerabilities play only a tiny role in the security risks that come with mobile phones

Both bad news (all devices were pwnd) and good news (pwning is increasingly difficult) came from the most recent mobile Pwn2Own competition. But the practical security risks that come with using mobile phones have little to do with vulnerabilities.

VB2017 paper: The (testing) world turned upside down

At VB2017 in Madrid, industry veteran and ESET Senior Research Fellow David Harley presented a paper on the state of security software testing. Today we publish David's paper in both HTML and PDF format.