Throwback Thursday: Tools of the DDoS Trade

Posted by   Helen Martin on   May 4, 2017

According to a recent report by analytics firm Neustar (summarized in a Threatpost blog post here), DDoS attacks are on the increase, are taking longer to detect, and are costing firms more to fix - with an average loss per attack of roughly $2.5 million among those companies surveyed.

Back in 2000, DDoS attacks were a relatively newly emerging menace (even though the concept had been around for some time), and February 2000 saw some of the Internet's largest websites, including CNN, MSN, Yahoo and others, disrupted by DDoS attacks.

Today, we turn back the clock to September 2000, when Aleksander Czarnowksi provided an overview of the DDoS tools of the day, saying "We still do not have one proper method of dealing with DDoS attacks, and what we have seen up to now might not be the end of it."

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 The article can be read here in HTML-format, or downloaded here as a PDF.

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