Benefit now from early bird discount tickets for VB2018

Posted by   Martijn Grooten on   Jun 25, 2018

In a little over three months, security experts from around the world will gather in Montreal for VB2018, the 28th Virus Bulletin International Conference.

We have an exciting programme lined up already, with keynote addresses from John Lambert (Microsoft) and Wendy Nather (Duo Security); workshops on Android reverse engineering and kernel mode malware analysis; papers on a wide range of pertinent security topics; and some exciting additions to be announced soon.

VB2018-banner.jpg

And there will be great people from around the world in attendance. That, perhaps, is the biggest asset of the conference, for it is here where you can build those connections that are so essential in your work throughout the year.

All the more reason for you to come to Montreal. And there's an extra reason to buy your ticket now: early bird discounts are available until 30 June!

VB2018-withdate-325w.jpg

 

twitter.png
fb.png
linkedin.png
googleplus.png
reddit.png

 

Latest posts:

New paper: Does malware based on Spectre exist?

It is likely that, by now, everyone in computer science has at least heard of the Spectre attack, and many excellent explanations of the attack already exist. But what is the likelihood of finding Spectre being exploited on Android smartphones?

More VB2018 partners announced

We are excited to announce several more companies that have partnered with VB2018.

Malware authors' continued use of stolen certificates isn't all bad news

A new malware campaign that uses two stolen code-signing certificates shows that such certificates continue to be popular among malware authors. But there is a positive side to malware authors' use of stolen certificates.

Save the dates: VB2019 to take place 2-4 October 2019

Though the location will remain under wraps for a few more months, we are pleased to announce the dates for VB2019, the 29th Virus Bulletin International Conference.

Necurs update reminds us that the botnet cannot be ignored

The operators of the Necurs botnet, best known for being one of the most prolific spam botnets of the past few years, have pushed out updates to its client, which provide some important lessons about why malware infections matter.

We have placed cookies on your device in order to improve the functionality of this site, as outlined in our cookies policy. However, you may delete and block all cookies from this site and your use of the site will be unaffected. By continuing to browse this site, you are agreeing to Virus Bulletin's use of data as outlined in our privacy policy.