Paper: EternalBlue: a prominent threat actor of 2017–2018

Posted by   Martijn Grooten on   Jun 11, 2018

A little over a year ago, one of the defining security events of the decade occurred: the WannaCry outbreak. A damaging and destructive cyber attack that hit the UK's National Health Service particularly hard.

The high infection rate of WannaCry was in large part thanks to its implementation of 'EternalBlue', an exploit of a remote code execution vulnerability in Windows SMB. What made the story rather juicy is that EternalBlue had initially been written by the NSA and had been made public a month prior to the WannaCry outbreak, as part of one of the Shadow Brokers' dumps. This particular dump included a number of other exploits and tools, one of which was the 'DoublePulsar' backdoor.

Though a kill switch prevented WannaCry from doing any further damage, both EternalBlue and DoublePulsar continue to be used in other malware, with EternalBlue detections going up rather than down.

Given the relevance of these exploits, we are excited to publish a research paper by Pradeep Kulkarni, Sameer Patil, Prashant Kadam and Aniruddha Dolas, researchers from Quick Heal Security Labs in India. In the paper, they provide technical details of EternalBlue, DoublePulsar and other tools from the same toolset. You can find the paper in both HTML and PDF format.

eternalblue-fig27.pngEternalBlue detection statistics.

twitter.png
fb.png
linkedin.png
googleplus.png
reddit.png

 

Latest posts:

Red Eyes threat group targets North Korean defectors

A research paper by AhnLab researcher Minseok Cha looks at the activities of the Red Eyes threat group (also known as Group 123 and APT 37), whose targets include North Korean defectors, as well as journalists and human rights defenders focused on…

VB announces Threat Intelligence Summit to take place during VB2018

We are very excited to announce a special summit, as part of VB2018, that will be dedicated to all aspects of threat intelligence.

VB2018 Small Talk: An industry approach for unwanted software criteria and clean requirements

An industry approach for defining and detecting unwanted software to be presented and discussed at the Virus Bulletin conference.

VB2018 call for last-minute papers opened

The call for last-minute papers for VB2018 is now open. Submit before 2 September to have your abstract considered for one of the nine slots reserved for 'hot' research.

VB2017 paper and update: Browser attack points still abused by banking trojans

At VB2017, ESET researchers Peter Kálnai and Michal Poslušný looked at how banking malware interacts with browsers. Today we publish their paper, share the video of their presentation, and also publish a guest blog post from Peter, in which he…

We have placed cookies on your device in order to improve the functionality of this site, as outlined in our cookies policy. However, you may delete and block all cookies from this site and your use of the site will be unaffected. By continuing to browse this site, you are agreeing to Virus Bulletin's use of data as outlined in our privacy policy.