Virus Bulletin - August 2006


Editor: Helen Martin

Technical Consultant: John Hawes

Technical Editor: Morton Swimmer

Consulting Editor: Ian Whalley, Nick FitzGerald, Richard Ford, Edward Wilding

2006-08-01


Comment

The great Mac debate

'You could be killed in either Bournemouth or Baghdad, but I know which destination I would be more concerned about.' Graham Cluley, Sophos, UK

Graham Cluley - Sophos, UK

News

Sysinternals goes the Microsoft way

Microsoft acquires company behind the Sysinternals range of freeware tools.


Linux magazine prints rootkit how-to

Arming sys admins with all they need to know to write a rootkit...


More on the XP comparative

Setting the record straight.


Malware prevalence report

June 2006

The Virus Bulletin prevalence table is compiled monthly from virus reports received by Virus Bulletin; both directly, and from other companies who pass on their statistics.


Virus analyses

Malicious Yahooligans

Making its appearance in June 2006, JS.Yamanner@m was the first webmail worm. Eric Chien has all the details.

Eric Chien - Symantec, Ireland

Star what?

A macro virus for StarOffice, or merely an intended? Vesselin Bontchev sets the record straight.

Dr Vesselin Bontchev - FRISK Software International, Iceland

Feature

Dial M for malware

Should we be worrying about mobile phone threats? Tomer Honen and Alexey Lyashko look at the risks.

Tomer Honen - Aladdin Knowledge Systems, Israel & Alexey Lyashko -

Comparative review

VB Comparative: Novell NetWare 6.5 - August 2006

John Hawes's first task as VB's new Technical Consultant was to run a comparative review of AV products for NetWare. See how John and the eight products fared.

John Hawes - Virus Bulletin

Spam Bulletin

Spam Bulletin - August 2006

Anti-spam news; SPUTR: a proposal for the uniform naming of spammer and phisher content tricks (feature)


 

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