More VB Conference papers and videos published

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Jan 29, 2016

11 papers and 9 videos added to our website.

In the security industry, we're used to people saying sorry: "sorry we chose a default password of 12345678"; "sorry we didn't look after your personal data better"; "sorry we didn't discover this huge vulnerability earlier"; and so on.

In that context, my reason for apologising is far more mundane. There were some great papers and presentations given at our VB2014 conference in Seattle that we simply haven't yet got around to publishing.

Sorry.

VB2014 Seattle

But better late than never: the following are the remaining papers and presentations. Enjoy!

(If you like what you see here, and are interested in presenting your own research at the upcoming Virus Bulletin conference (VB2016), in Denver 5-7 October 2016, why not submit a proposal? The call for papers is now open.)

An in-depth analysis of abuse on Twitter (Jonathan Oliver, Paul Pajares, Christopher Ke, Chao Chen, Yang Xiang). HTML, PDF.

Evolution of Android exploits from a static analysis tools perspective (Anna Szalay, Jagadeesh Chandraiah). HTML, PDF.

Android packers: facing the challenges, building solutions (Rowland Yu). HTML, PDF.

Linux-based Apache malware infections: biting the hand that serves us all (Cathal Mullaney, Sayali Kulkarni). HTML, PDF.

Notes on click fraud: American story (Peter Kalnai, Jaromir Horejsi). HTML, PDF.

Can we trust a trustee? An in-depth look into the digitally signed malware industry (Adrian-Stefan Popescu, Gheorghe Jescu). HTML, PDF.

It has a EULA, it must be legit (Stefan Catalin Hanu, Stefan Mosoi, Marius Lucaci). HTML, PDF.

How they're getting the data out of your network: a survey of methods used for exfiltration of sensitive data, recommendations for detection and protection (Eric Koeppen). HTML, PDF.

Protecting financial institutions from man-in-the-browser attacks (Xinrang Wang, Yao Zhao). HTML, PDF.

Tech Support Scams 2.0: An inside look into the evolution of the classic Microsoft tech support scam (Jerome Segura). HTML, PDF.

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