VB2018: looking for technical and non-technical talks

Posted by   Martijn Grooten on   Mar 9, 2018

Nine days from today, the call for papers for VB2018 will close. We've already received many great submissions (in fact, we already have more proposals than we have places to fill), but we like to get as many as we can to allow us to put together the best possible programme.

As you will probably know from previous conference programmes, we like good, solid technical talks. Whether it's a malware analysis, presentation of new tools, dissection of threat campaigns – we love to hear what you have to share.

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But good talks don't have to be technical, and the fact that a talk is non-technical doesn't mean that the issue discussed is easy to solve, no matter what the experts may claim. Issues such as the use of spyware in domestic abuse cases or the state of security in healthcare are just as important, if not more so.

So, don't feel overwhelmed by the high level of some of the talks on previous programmes: we welcome the less technical submissions just as much.

You've got until 18 March to submit a paper – don't hesitate to contact us should you have any questions!

 

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