New paper: Does malware based on Spectre exist?

Posted by   Martijn Grooten on   Jul 16, 2018

The discovery of the Spectre and Meltdown attacks in January cast a long shadow over the year, with many of the issued security patches having their own problems and several new variants of the two attacks having been discovered.

spectre_logo.png meltdown_logo.png

 

Yet many questions about the attacks remain unanswered. In a presentation at the inaugural Pass the Salt conference earlier this month, Fortinet researcher Axelle Apvrille tried to answer two of these questions:

  1. Are Android phones vulnerable to Spectre-based attacks? 
  2. How can we detect malware that uses Spectre, and does any exist?

Axelle has written a paper for VB based on her presentation, which we are pleased to publish today, both in HTML and PDF format.

Axelle's focus on Android isn't surprising: she is one of the world's leading researchers when it comes to mobile malware in general, and Android in particular – and for that reason we are excited that she will deliver a short workshop on Android reverse engineering at VB2018 in Montreal this October.

Axelle's workshop is just one of many great reasons to come to VB2018. Check out the speaker page for details of other leading experts presenting at the event, and check out the programme for full details of what else is on the agenda - book your ticket now for what promises to be a memorable event!

twitter.png
fb.png
linkedin.png
googleplus.png
reddit.png

 

Latest posts:

VB2018 preview: Unpacking the packed unpacker: reversing an Android anti-analysis library

At VB2018, Google researcher Maddie Stone will present an analysis of the multi-layered 'WeddingCake' anti-analysis library used by many Android malware families.

VB2018 preview: From drive-by download to drive-by mining

At VB2018, Malwarebytes researcher Jérôme Segura will discuss the rise of drive-by cryptocurrency mining, explaining how it works and putting it in the broader context of changes in the cybercrime landscape.

Red Eyes threat group targets North Korean defectors

A research paper by AhnLab researcher Minseok Cha looks at the activities of the Red Eyes threat group (also known as Group 123 and APT 37), whose targets include North Korean defectors, as well as journalists and human rights defenders focused on…

VB announces Threat Intelligence Summit to take place during VB2018

We are very excited to announce a special summit, as part of VB2018, that will be dedicated to all aspects of threat intelligence.

VB2018 Small Talk: An industry approach for unwanted software criteria and clean requirements

An industry approach for defining and detecting unwanted software to be presented and discussed at the Virus Bulletin conference.

We have placed cookies on your device in order to improve the functionality of this site, as outlined in our cookies policy. However, you may delete and block all cookies from this site and your use of the site will be unaffected. By continuing to browse this site, you are agreeing to Virus Bulletin's use of data as outlined in our privacy policy.