VB2018 Small Talk: An industry approach for unwanted software criteria and clean requirements

Posted by   Martijn Grooten on   Aug 7, 2018

The constantly evolving threat landscape poses challenges for security vendors. But an equally big, if less reported, challenge is that posed by the kind of software that lives on the border between what is acceptable, and what isn't.

A number of vendors have recently got together in an attempt to align industry approaches and to define clear criteria for both installer and application behaviour. Details will be presented at VB2018 in Montreal this October by Avira's Alexander Vukcevic and Avast's Jiri Sejtko in a Small Talk that has recently been added to the programme.

As is typical of these Small Talks, the presentation will be followed by an active discussion on how to define, collect, track and align criteria for both (potentially) unwanted and clean software.

Jiri and Alexander's Small Talk is just one of many great reasons to come to VB2018. Check out the programme for full details of what else is on the agenda - and book your ticket now for what promises to be a memorable event!

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