Last-minute paper: Publishing our malware stats

Thursday 5 October 09:00 - 09:30, Green room

Jason Woloz (Google)



At VB2016, Android Security hosted a 'small talk' on how we as an industry can come together to share threat info more effectively with the community. Android has set a goal to be transparent by publishing more data about PHA in the Android ecosystem. Today, we will present the trends we've been seeing in malware, and describe how we're going to publish that data. We will also talk about how AVs and MTP vendors can share details about new malware families with Android that can be incorporated into our public dashboard. In exchange, we will cite the researchers that contributed and we will share what we know about the family to inform the AV publication.

 

Jason-Woloz-web.jpg

Jason Woloz

In his role as Sr. Program Manager of Google's Android Security team, Jason is responsible for ensuring the health and wellness of Google Play Protect's anti-malware  program as well as industry outreach and research. Before joining Android Jason worked on a variety of cross-functional privacy and security engineering projects across Google. Prior to Google Jason held various leadership roles in security, including Chief Information Security Officer for a global SaaS provider. 



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